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Dutch dating rules

15 comments While many foreigners initially find dating in the Netherlands daunting or inaccessible, understanding Dutch personality traits and mentality can help reduce miscommunicating the ‘flirting' signals as practised by Dutch women and Dutch men.

Of course, similar to elsewhere, online dating in the Netherlands is increasingly becoming the norm as taboos are shed, particularly among older daters.

A derivative is "Sharing Dutch", which stands for having a joint ownership of luxury goods.

For example: four people share the ownership of a plane, boat, car or any other sharable high-end product.

In addition to those specific to the Dutch, many general points of European etiquette apply to the Dutch as well. Accumulating money is fine, but public spending of large amounts of money is considered something of a vice and associated with being a show-off.

Dutch society is egalitarian, individualistic and modern. A high lifestyle is considered wasteful by most people and sometimes met with suspicion.

Did you experience any differences in rules about dating or relationships? If you’re on a party or in a bar in Austria as a girl and standing there for just 5 min.

alone then the men will stick on you like flies – in Breda that never happened. They seem to be really shy when it comes to showing attraction to the other gender.

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In strict usage, "Going Dutch" refers to the former, paying one's own expenses, and the latter is referred to as "splitting the bill", but in casual usage these may both be referred to as "going Dutch".

So far I did not see people making out with each other on parties.

One exchange student took the chance to kiss a boy she got to know at a party and the day after everybody was giggling in school when she rushed by and they even assumed that she did that because she wanted to attract interest and being famous then.

Both Dutch women and Dutch men are renowned for being straight-forward in conversation, and little social negativity is attached to asking personal questions or openly stating one's unsolicited opinion in the Netherlands.

The Dutch tend to believe it is better to be honest than mislead someone.

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