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The dubious science of online dating

But can a mathematical formula really identify pairs of singles who are especially likely to have a successful romantic relationship? It’s hard to be certain, since the sites have not disclosed their algorithms.But — as we and our co-authors argue in an article to be published this month in the journal People typically report substantive changes to their personality when they become intoxicated, but observations from outsiders suggest differences between ‘sober’ and ‘drunk’ personalities are less drastic…Nota bene, however, that Ok Cupid, Tinder, and are all owned by Match Group, Inc., which—across all three platforms—boasts 59 million active users per month, 4.7 million of whom have paid accounts.Match Group’s only real competitor is e Harmony, a site aimed at older daters, reviled by many for its founder’s homophobic politics.“Can you bring me something citrusy, bourbon-based? He pauses to consider—one eyebrow askew—then deftly recites three cocktail options that, one has to assume, will meet her specifications.And right from that moment I just, in the murky, preverbal way one knows such things, that this young woman—let’s call her Ms. I know that the next 45 minutes or so we spend at this dimly lit Cambridge, Massachusetts, restaurant will be, in some sense, a waste of her time and mine, but that politeness or decency or some other vaguely moral compulsion will detain us at the table anyway, sipping bourbon-based cocktails and struggling to find a good topic to converse about.Some sites even promise “scientific formulas” to create perfect matches, making it sound as if the odds of finding true love are all but guaranteed.Unfortunately, though, just like that certain someone who fails to call for a follow-up date, there are indications these sites don’t come through on their promises.

Sites may say they use scientific methods and proven algorithms as the basis for matching, but they don’t release the data due to proprietary reasons, or the data they produce don’t fit the criteria for scientific acceptability.Dating sites don’t use controlled studies, for example, which would be nearly impossible.These issues haven’t stopped promoters from making outlandish, unproven claims, such as the bizarre one from Gene Partner, a site that says its matchmaking abilities are superior because it incorporates users’ DNA: “Now, hard science is making it easier to find true love.But perhaps I shouldn’t be surprised: We met through Ok Cupid—85 percent match, 23 percent enemy (which sums to 108 percent, seems to me).Although many users, especially younger users, prefer swipe-based dating apps like Tinder—or its female-founded alter ego, Bumble (on which only women can write first messages)—Ok Cupid’s mathematical approach to online dating remains popular.Based on the numbers alone, the advantages of online dating services seem obvious.The sites grant access to larger pools of potential dates than you could ever find on your own, and the more people you connect with, the greater the chance is that one of those people could be your soul mate.The genus name is derived from Latin While initially considered to have come from the Yixian Formation of China, dated to approximately 125 million years ago during the early Cretaceous period, later studies showed that such an early date for the fossil are unlikely, and given its extremely close similarity to juvenile tyrannosaurids of the late Cretaceous, it probably came from the Iren Dabasu or similar formation.Because the specimen is a juvenile, and the changes undergone by tyrannosaurids during growth are not yet well understood, many researchers now consider it to be a nomen dubium, because it cannot be confidently paired with an adult skeleton (though it is extremely similar to juvenile Tarbosaurus bataar skeletons of the same size and age).Vibrating machines of all shapes and sizes—from handheld personal vibrators marketed to women for the treatment of "hysteria," to vibrating head massagers designed to stimulate hair follicles, to infamous quack John Harvey Kellogg's vibrating chair—have enjoyed popularity at various times since 1900.From the 1950s to the 1970s they were sold as weight loss equipment.

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